Your Canning Garden 2016

M

MrsPinecone

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I live in the woods and have almost zero sun for a garden, but I totally admire people who can have a veggie garden.

What have you planted this year with an eye toward canning or freezing your own produce?
 

mtka

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I made my first batch of refrigerator pickles today. 2 quarts, with some homegrown cucumbers and some fresh dill from the amish store. Have to wait 3 days, so will see what they turn out like. I remember my mother trying to make pickles when I was young, we got a jar of slimy cucumbers.

Also, put in yet another batch of green beans in the freezer and still have loads to pick. I make homemade dog food, and use lots of veggies ground up with chicken or turkey, so the beans won't last that long.
 

Green is Gold

Member of the Month 6/12 - Queen Of Circle Driving
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So far all I have picked is a few watermelon radishes and these 3 bell peppers.
The radishes are peppery and have been sliced on salads, I gave a couple to my mom and the neighbor too.
The peppers will be stuffed peppers when I'm off on Thursday.
No red tomatoes yet and the cucumbers are taking over my garden but none are ready yet.

We freeze the peppers and tomatoes.
No clue what I will do with all those cucumbers if we get as many as it looks like we will!
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Green is Gold

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@Gardencook Soooo...this came out of my cucumbers yesterday...
Umm...WHAT IS IT?!? Hahaha!
Best I can tell...White Wonder in a freakishly large size??? :oops:
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Green is Gold

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Oh yeah...there was also a watermelon radish as big as my husband's head... LOL!
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Gardencook

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@Gardencook Soooo...this came out of my cucumbers yesterday...
Umm...WHAT IS IT?!? Hahaha!
Best I can tell...White Wonder in a freakishly large size??? :oops:
14089573_1801721390084203_1819363670_n.jpg

I'm afraid I can't tie down a variety for you GIG.

It does look like like one of the white cucumber varieties you see in seed catalogs, however.

Is it from a package of seeds or did you save the seed yourself?

Who knows what gets mixed into seeds at the factory, so you may have a very rare cucumber there. Sometimes an errant bee will pollinate from a neighbors garden if you save seed, sometimes they just revert back to a previous generation, or you may get an interesting hybrid like I did one year when we rented a house in the valley where my garden was GORGEOUS!

I had a summer squash plant volunteer from the compost and let it grow. I ended up with squash that were split perfectly down the middle. The top half was a yellow crookneck and the bottom half was green zucchini. It was just like someone had cut two squash in half and pasted them together.

I saved seed, hoping to see if the fruit would produce true the next year. Unfortunately, the landlords decided to sell and rather than have people tromping through our house constantly, we opted to move. The seed got lost in the shuffle and we got stuck renting a house at the top of a VERY high hill which was a nightmare in winter. Lost all my potatoes to potato beetles in that house, but my cilantro went wild there -- something I can't say for our current home.

I gave up on cukes several years ago due to our climate. Kept having high hopes, but it wasn't worth the disappointment.

Snow in April, May and even June is pretty common here. We usually get a heat wave of at least 90 to 100 degrees in May and that is when the cucumber plants are available. If you wait until June there are none to buy.

You plant the cukes and they look gorgeous... until the June monsoons arrive with temps near freezing at night again. The poor babies just rot away and vanish after that.

If you plant from seed, our season isn't long enough. We're supposed to get down in the 30s or 40s tonight, so already have the windows shut for the day.

We live in a valley. The lowlands are much warmer, even though we are a couple streets above the bottom. LOL!

However, the bottom of the valley is also where the water from prehistoric Lake Bonneville drained, so the soil is sandier there and not the cold, heavy clay we've got 100 feet above.

If you live in the valley, you have to buy flood insurance. If you live in the hills it is tough to get down in winter and the wildfires are a big threat. We tried to compromise and bought toward the very bottom of a hill -- not too steep, nor prone to flooding. Just didn't realize how dense the clay was going to be -- but the view across the valley is pretty. ;)
 
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