Southern Jugged Soup -- Appreciate Your Slow Cooker!

Gardencook

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Picked up a 1949 vintage cookbook at a thrift store a couple weeks ago. Came across this recipe which predates the Crock Pot by nearly 20 years. Women were still slow cooking, before the invention -- but it was a bit more work.

Actually, it might work pretty well on a wood stove like @avlmoyer owns, but I think the rest of us will probably want to stick with our appliances! :giggle2:

Southern Jugged Soup

6 potatoes, sliced
1 onion, sliced

6 tomatoes or 2 cups canned tomatoes

1 turnip, diced
2-1/2 cups canned peas
1 carrot grated
1/4 cup uncooked rice
1 tablespoon salt
1 tablespoon sugar
1/2 teaspoon pepper,
Dash allspice
2 quarts soup stock


Arrange vegetables, rice and seasonings in alternate layers in the bottom of a stone crock with a cover or a casserole. To make the soup stock; boil bones of cold chicken, roast meat or steak with trimmings in 3-quarts of water., until liquid is reduced to 2-quarts. Strain. Cool broth and pour over vegetables. Cover and seal, using tape or muslin, to keep in the steam. Set crock in a pan of hot water. Place in slow oven (300 degrees F.) and cook 6 hours. Serves 8.


From: 250 Delicious Soup Recipes, Culinary Arts Institute, Consolidated Book Publishers, 1949
 
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avlmoyer

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That sounds like quite a recipe @gardensoup, one you aren't likely going to find on Allrecipes.com or any crock pot recipe book/manual. I hope I always have my wood stove for heat and "Cooking". I actually have a cast iron frying pan on there now cleaning the supper mess up. I had a Great Grandpa that lived to be 98 years old and lived at home until he died. He was in a wheel chair in his later years. He would stick his feet in the wood stove oven to heat his feet up when he felt chilled. Back to the soup, the other night I was asking for help to make soup for supper with hamburger then wiped out with a nasty wicked headache. Anyway, the headaches has calmed and I finally got that soup made tonight.

Refrig. Soup:
A little hamburger, a little sausage fried up with a little dried onion. I chopped up some free carrots from a coupon back in December. We added leftover brown rice, leftover canned creamed corn, a qt. of leftover tomato puree made from greenhouse tomatoes. ( we were fortunate enough to be included in a green house's gleaning at end of the season). This was spiced up with garlic, Italian seasonings, sugar, salt and pepper and allowed to simmer. Just right for a winter evening.
 

greenfrog57

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I like old cookbooks, but you lost me at turnip ando canned peas. No thanks.
 

Gardencook

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Actually, those old wood stoves were pretty practical creations. I can totally see this soup working on one.

My FIL was only 2 pounds when he was born and they used a wood stove warmer as an incubator.

I've always had problems with the dry wood stove heat myself. Even a tea kettle on top doesn't put enough moisture in the air. A friend used to use one and I ABSOLUTELY could not breathe in his house in winter, due to the dryness. I suspect when the heat from the stove was used to heat water in the water heater tank attached that probably took care of the situation. Those tanks were pretty good size and would have added a LOT of humidity to the air.
 

Gardencook

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I like old cookbooks, but you lost me at turnip ando canned peas. No thanks.

I'm kinda like that with turnips, myself. :wink7:

This cookbook came out just after the war. Think VICTORY GARDENS. Turnips keep well in the ground in winter and considering how short the pea season is, those home canned peas were about the only peas many people had 11 months of the year.

That book came out the year my grandmother got her first refrigerator. Know that bit of trivia, because it was the year my parents married. My father owned a refrigerator and my mother felt guilty moving into a home with one when her mother didn't have one. My father told her to buy one. (She had lots of savings bonds tucked away from the war.) So my mother sent the money to her sister and my uncle (who became an electrician through the post-war GI bill) wired the kitchen for it.

Thought the recipe was pretty interesting from an historical perspective.
 

greenfrog57

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@Gardencook - I love the history and reading of your family history as well. Some of my favorite books are historical novels that include the surprise recipe or more. (Big Stone Gap and The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society come to mind).
 

Gardencook

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@Gardencook - I love the history and reading of your family history as well. Some of my favorite books are historical novels that include the surprise recipe or more. (Big Stone Gap and The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society come to mind).

Sounds like an interesting book.

It wasn't until a few years ago, I learned my mom and grandmother were sending "care packages" of food to my grandfather's family in **** occupied Denmark during the war. My mom's family had very little, but my grandfather's family was nearly starving. It was a different era. I can't even imagine the packages making it through the mail without being stolen during war in this day and age.

Not a novel, but if you don't mind non-fiction The Potato: How the Humble Spud Rescued the Western World is actually not the boring egghead book you'd expect it to be! I borrowed it from the library, so you may not have to buy it.

I've got to admit I've got rather eclectic taste in literature. (Don't know how many 1000+ page James Michener novels I LOVED for all the history in them! My sister was bored stiff with them. :giggle2: ) However, the spud book did a LOT for understanding the importance of food in the grand scheme of history. It actually covers a whole lot more than potatoes. Checked it out with several other books and once I got that one started I couldn't put it down.

Also checked out one on the history of food in the life of Pacific Northwest pioneers. Can't remember the name of it now, but considering most of it took place around Vancouver, Washington where I grew up (Fort Vancouver was at the end of the Oregon Trail) I actually found it quite fascinating. Didn't have a clue how early so many "modern inventions" were making it to Vancouver while Seattle was still struggling to get a cargo ship to supply it.
 
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