Recipes - Question Cast-Iron Cooking

dreamingtree

New Member
I got a thirteen piece cast iron set for christmas and I love it. What are some great meals for cooking in cast iron? So far everything seems to be better in this set. just love it.:BigHand:
 

Gardencook

Well-Known Member
Trader Group
The biggest food difference I notice with cast iron is hash browns. You can't get the same sort of delicious, crispy hash browns without cast iron. And since we turn a LOT of leftovers into hash -- whether it be leftover chicken, beef, lamb or fish -- we get a lot of really tasty leftovers!
Of course, the same goes for cornbread. I've made it in a skillet several times and loved it each time, but I'm a creature of habit and seem to grab a cake pan without thinking most of the time. :rolleyes24:
I definitely prefer beans cooked in a cast iron Dutch oven to other pans, as well.
 
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motherofmolly

Guest
2013 i am going to switch to nothign but cast iron cooking. i just cook my regular stuff in it. i have 5 skillets (3 need to be cleaned as they were given to me) and one large cooker. i am looking for a few more cookers and an original waffle maker this year.

you can also do biscuits and stuff on the stove.
 
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OneHotMomma

Guest
The biggest food difference I notice with cast iron is hash browns. You can't get the same sort of delicious, crispy hash browns without cast iron. And since we turn a LOT of leftovers into hash -- whether it be leftover chicken, beef, lamb or fish -- we get a lot of really tasty leftovers!
Of course, the same goes for cornbread. I've made it in a skillet several times and loved it each time, but I'm a creature of habit and seem to grab a cake pan without thinking most of the time. :rolleyes24:
I definitely prefer beans cooked in a cast iron Dutch oven to other pans, as well.

My hashbrowns always stick, tips?
 

Gardencook

Well-Known Member
Trader Group
My hashbrowns always stick, tips?

When I first use a cast iron pan, I season it really well with oil in the oven, just like the instructions say.
Then for a few weeks after that, each time I wash the pan I rub oil onto it before I store it back in the cupboard. Then I add a little more oil to the pan when I go to cook something. I'm a big olive oil fan, so that's what I use. Eventually the pan gets a nice sheen of "seasoning" to it and then it will act a lot like non-stick cookware and things slide right off. Of course, I still always add a little oil to the pan when I cook, but we aren't big fat eaters so it is a minimal amount.
If you are into deep-frying or even frying-chicken in a few inches of oil, I think it would do a really good job of building up a good coat of seasoning, as well.
I know some people claim they never wash their cast iron, but guess I'm too much of a "germaphobe" for that. :giggle2: To me it feels safer to wash the pan and then go through the routine of rubbing more oil into the pan when the seasoning gets a bit thin. The big thing is to keep an eye on the "sheen." Whenever that starts to get dull, add more oil to the pan and build it back up again.
 
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cheynesnana

Guest
I used to wash mine too Gardencook... just doesn't seem sanitary to me to wipe it out and put it away LOL

I miss mine.. in all my moves over the last 12 years my favorite pan got lost... it was a small skillet, perfectly seasoned and wonderful to make cornbread in!
 
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Smee

Guest
When it's in the early stages of seasoning, I only do an oil & salt scrub, rinse, dry thoroughly, and put away. I do not soap them at all in the early stages and would shank the poor soul who dared try it. I don't worry about food residue, and it's going to be heated, anyway. Once it's well seasoned, though, I don't mind washing with soap and water. I always do re oil my pans before putting away, though, regardless of whether they're new or old.

I'm a whole lot more likely to freak out on someone for touching something in my kitchen without washing hands first.

Best tip I can offer for unsticking stuck on stuff with newer or not well seasoned pans is deglazing. While the pan is still hot, slowly whisk in some water and just keep whisking over lowish heat until all the gunk has come loose. No need for scrubbing, and sometimes you end up with awesome gravy out of it. To me, pan leavin's beg to be made into gravy. A completely unstuck pan is just, well, gravy.
 

queenofthehivemomof5

Admin Hottie
Trader Group
Nothing beats fried chicken in a cast iron skillet. I only make it once a year for all the fat and work that goes into it but it is SO yummy. And like Smee said...um yeah gravy for some smothered fried chicken....

I also love mine for skillet meals where I toss in some meat (hamburger, chicken, etc), make some sort of sauce and toss in some rice or pasta. Maybe top it off with cheese or something. Easy dinner. Like Hamburger Helper without all those mystery ingredients.

I have several cast iron pieces One was my great grandmothers - it has to be close to 100 years old now. And several that I have picked up at yard sales and thrift stores. Even rusty ones that look like hell can be fixed (steel wool and veggie oil to remove the rust then season well) and they last forever.

And I agree cast iron rocks for hash browns or home fries (skillet potatoes). But I can never get them non-stick enough for eggs.
 
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Barbie08

Guest
My mom puts steak in the oven in her cast iron skillet and it is great, really juicy
 

dreamingtree

New Member
Thanks yall for all the great tips, I had no idea you could cook biscuits on stove top, and all the cleaning tips are great. I think i am going to try the oil and salt till they are better seasoned cuz they always look dull again after i clean them. I will for sure be looking at the other threads for cast iron on the site. Thanks again!! learned a lot.
 

Gardencook

Well-Known Member
Trader Group
Another thing to keep in mind is Jeff Smith's old catch-phrase: Hot pan, cold oil: food won't stick. I always put my cast iron on the burner to heat while I'm getting the first of my food ready to stick in the pan. It really does help when you're pan is heated BEFORE you stick the oil in it.
Hope you enjoy your cookware!
 

Gardencook

Well-Known Member
Trader Group
I wasn't actually looking for this, but stumbled across it when looking at the USU Extension site. It is a 14-page pdf booklet with tips and recipes for using cast iron. Thought you might enjoy it!
Cast Iron Cooking
 
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cpaige

Guest
I found 2 pieces at a yard sale: a nice big pot, like for frying in and a saucepan. When you clean them, what do you do? Always re-season it afterwards? I love them but rarely use them b/c I can never get them cleaned completely and like others said, just wiping them out kind of grosses me out.
 

Gardencook

Well-Known Member
Trader Group
Once you get the seasoning on them, they are much easier to clean. Until that point the best thing you can do us use lots of oil. Season them to start, and make sure you have a good coating of oil on them the first few times you use them. Frying in them helps a lot. Then after you wash them, wipe oil on them before storing them. That will give the oil the chance to dry and make a coating on the iron. Then it is a good idea to add more oil before cooking. It takes a while, but eventually it will get a sheen of seasoning. As long as you store it with oil after washing, it should stay relatively non-stick.
 
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jonjaktez

Guest
I try to cook as much as I can in cast iron. I love the few peices we have. Also when using cast iron, if you have an issue with low iron count, cast iron will give you the iron your body needs.

Congrats on your christmas present and when you begin using them, you'll love them. Plus they last for ever!
 
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Mama Stu

Guest
When ours get all black and crusty we throw them in a bon fire and let them burn completely down to the bare iron, then I re-season them in the oven and it's just like starting out with brand new pans.
 
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