Beans

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MrsPinecone

Guest
Since the cost of meat has gone sky high over the past couple of years, many people are looking for less expensive sources of protein.

This is an excellent article on the health benefits of beans: The Many Health Benefits of Beans - Off The Grid News

Even with coupons, canned beans are not always cheap or free. By canning your own, you can get a high volume for very little money. A 1lb bag of dried beans is generally between $1 and $2, depending on the variety. For that amount, you can get 6 to 8 pints of home-canned, ready to eat beans.

The Ball Blue Book has instructions for canning beans or this is the NCFHFP link.

PLEASE NOTE:

You must rehydrate the beans first. Placing dried beans in a jar and topping off with liquid is not endorsed by the National Center for Home Food Preservation.

You must have a pressure canner. There is no safe way to use a boiling water bath to can beans.
 
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to1drland

Guest
Re: Beans!

We can most of our beans from dry beans. I generally get 6-7 pints from 1 lb. of dry. It's a huge savings, just takes a bit of time.
 

saving-n-va

Well-Known Member
Trader Group
Re: Beans!

Ok, I have been wanting to can some beans, even have the jars and beans already. What I am confused about is this....

do I just soak the beans overnight and not cook them. (since it seems they would cook in the jar). Or do I cook them first? And how much do I put in the jar? Say for pints - Its like less than a cup of beans right? So that gives them room to expand.

I'm also going to try some dehyrdated beans. (you cook them then dehydrate them, that way when you want to cook say a soup, they don't take as long).
 
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clippyclippy

Guest
Re: Beans!

How does the finished product compare to freezing the beans? Any preference?
 
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to1drland

Guest
Re: Beans!

BEANS OR PEAS – DRY
Sort out and discard any discolored seeds. Rehydrate beans or peas using one of the following methods:.

*Place dry beans or peas in a large pot and cover with water. Soak 12 to 18 hours in a cool place. Then drain.

*Cover beans with boiling water in a saucepan. Boil 2 minutes, remove from heat and soak 1 hour. Then drain.

Cover beans soaked by either method with fresh water and boil 30 minutes.

Hot Pack—Fill clean, hot Mason jars with beans or peas and cooking water, leaving 1-inch headspace. Adjust jar lids.

Dial Gauge Canner—Process at 11 pounds pressure - Pints 75 minutes and Quarts 90 minutes. For processing above 2,000 feet altitude, see chart for recommended pounds of pressure.

Weighted Gauge Canner—Process at 10 pounds pressure - Pints 75 minutes and Quarts 90 minutes. For processing above 1,000 feet altitude, see chart for recommended pounds of pressure.
 
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to1drland

Guest
Re: Beans!

How does the finished product compare to freezing the beans? Any preference?

I've found they're about the same. but I don't want to use up valuable freezer space when i don't have to.
 
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OneHotMomma

Guest
Ok, when I can beans they seem to explode inside the jar instead of staying whole. Any ideas why this is happening?
 

saving-n-va

Well-Known Member
Trader Group
Perhaps you are putting too many beans in the jars, so they are so stuffed they explode?

I canned garbanzos a few months ago, I hope to can some pintos and black beans in January. (after the holidays). I have to allow more room next time. I'd also like to try to make seasoned chili beans.
 
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OneHotMomma

Guest
I'll try using less and see if it helps. Thanks for the suggestion.
 
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JulieDB

Guest
I can't see why you'd need to can them. These days the beans you get at the store are usually so fresh that they don't take long to cook. I've been doing the quick soak method.

Rinse and sort through the beans. Add water to about an inch or two over the top of the beans. Bring to a boil. Boil for a minute or up to 10 minutes depending on what kind of beans you are making. I think black and kidney are the ones that need the full 10 minutes. Turn off the heat. Cover. Let sit for an hour. Drain off the water and rinse. Add more water (same amount). Cover. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat to a simmer and from there, watch the time. I've had pintos that cooked to perfection in half an hour! No more cooking for hours like I had to do when I was young and the stores were foisting old beans off on us without us knowing it. Of course if you have old beans in your house, they'll have to cook for longer. But the longest cook time I've had for any beans was 1.5 hours, if that.

I do not usually season the beans until they are fully cooked because I have read that salt and tomato products can toughen the beans. However, I did recently cook some beans with tomatoes added and they came out just fine.

If I want beans for the week, I just cook them on Sunday night or in the afternoon on Monday if I know I will be home. They keep well in the fridge for several days.
 
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MrsPinecone

Guest
Same as buying commercially canned beans... convenience. I don't often plan what we're having for a week. I like to be able to reach onto my shelf and grab a jar of black beans and throw it into dinner.
 

greenfrog57

Mod Of The Month July 2011
Staff member
Administrator
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Trader Group
I freeze them in 2-cup portions so I have the same convenience as canned. I can keep them about 4 months that way....
 
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MrsPinecone

Guest
When I canned my experimental beans (first run with the pressure canner), I added some pickle crisp to some of the jars. It did make a difference. The ones that didn't have it turned to moosh and the ones that did held their shape and more of the texture.

I just soaked my beans overnight. I did not do the 30 minutes of precooking.
 
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MrsPinecone

Guest
Time to can some beans, too. I picked up 2 lbs each of both black and pinto beans.
 
M

MrsPinecone

Guest
I finally got around to canning those beans last week. 2 lbs of dry beans made 10 pints of canned ones.

I put 1/2 cup of beans in each jar and soaked them for 18 hours. Then I drained the water, added salt and topped off with boiling water with 1" head space. Canned at 11 lbs pressure for 75 minutes. I skipped the "cook for 30 min" instruction before canning because the last time I did that, the beans basically turned to sludge in the jars from being overcooked.
 
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