PDA

View Full Version : My goal is to get GREENER!



emily26505
06-11-2008, 10:26:43 AM
I took a great quiz online to calculate my carbon footprint and I was astounded..and mine was still lower than the average! I consider myself a pretty eco-friendly person; I recycle, re-use, and am very frugal with my electric appliances, heating, and air conditioning. That being said, after taking the quiz you can choose from a *huge* list of personal pledges that require no money at all to get your lifestyle on a greener path. Many of these pledges I had never even heard of, but they are excellent ideas!

Such as..

Putting a filled plastic bottle full of water in your toilet's tank can save a few gallons of water each flush!

This can greatly reduce the amount of water you use per month.

Anyhoo..just wanted to see if anyone else had any similar goals/ideas for this. The environment is such a huge issue to me, and it just kills me to see that such a beautiful creation being trashed and ruined.



As a side note to this..does anyone else have any guilt about buying/stockpiling so many products each month and the environmental effect that it makes by purchasing these things? Because after all, it's not just the fact that what you buy and use will end up in the trash (or recycle bin) but the fuel and electricity and CO2 emissions that were created just to manufacture or produce a product.


Sorry so long, I just have a strong opinion :smile:


Oops..the website with the carbon calculator is:

Global Warming Community - Reduce Your Environmental Impact | EarthLab.com (http://www.earthlab.com)

hotcouponmama
06-11-2008, 10:32:32 AM
Have you been to Hotcouponworld's green sister site, Organic Grocery Deals (http://www.organicgrocerydeals.com?)

My thing is, not everyone can afford to be green. Sometimes, we have members who can barely make ends meet. Green might not be for them in purchasing, but they can do thinks about how they handle the waste from packaging, reusing jars, etc.

I think once you've gotten to a point where you're comfortable, then you can start making changes in your purchasing. But you have to be there financially first. You can't let going green break the bank for you because THAT'S not sustainable. So Organic Grocery Deals is really about where shoppers are starting to add to their stockpiles the green element.

Certainly, individual applesauce cups for example, are going to have an impact whether there is organic or non-organic applesauce inside the cups. But being ready financially to start couponing for the organic variety might have an impact on how the apples were produced and what that does to the land, and then of course, recycling the containers from either brand is a good way to reduce that environmental footprint.

It's all about baby-stepping to a greener way of life. But you have to be in a good spot with your finances to be ready to spend the $1 difference on the organic applesauce cups over the non-organic. And that's what the folks at OGD are looking to do.

Hope that makes sense!

queenofthehivemomof5
06-11-2008, 10:33:03 AM
I think going green is a great goal and to help you we have a sister site to hotcouponworld called organicgrocerydeals (http://organicgrocerydeals.com) if you are interested...

of course green discussion is great and allowed here I just thought I would let you know about our other site where you will be sure to find more like minded folks and topics!

emily26505
06-11-2008, 01:09:19 PM
Thanks for the reference, I had never heard of your sister site before, I'll definitely check it out!

Couponmama, I totally agree about the financial burden of "going green". As of yet, I cannot say that I am financially in a position to only purchase organic/eco-friendly products. I am just insinuating that there may be ways that we are not aware of to reduce in other ways as well (ie, the toilet-bottle idea). Another great tip from that website was to go for a run or bike ride outside instead of running on a treadmill in a gym (which uses electricity). This is still a free way to exercise that reduces the impact on the environment. They offer tips on energy saving such as using your windows as solar heat/ac for your home instead of using electric heat/ac.

And as far as the waste from all of my stockpiling products goes, that is where my real dilemma lies..I wanted to have input from anyone as to what they do with all of their waste. I recycle as much as I can, but there are certain things that cannot (that I know of) be recycled, such as razor cartridges, or empty tubes of toothpaste.

It is inevitable that I am forced to throw things in the trash can, so I try to come up with other ways to get green to offset my waste a little.

Just wanted to know if anyone else shares my view or has any tips/ideas etc for ways to reduce!
Thanks to both for the reference to that site, I am really excited to learn how to change my shopping habbits :)

chitownmelli
06-11-2008, 01:24:51 PM
Hey Emily! Great goal, and really hope to see you over at OGD!

We are re-users and recyclers as well. I totally agree on you with the waste involved and I sure do wish that it was more wallet friendly to coupon in a more eco friendly manner. I hope we all get there some day :) I'm gonna head over to that website that you listed, we are always interested in new ways to be green :)

Kyrthira
06-11-2008, 02:33:54 PM
Being a follower of a religion that has great respect for the earth, I say you're doing a great thing. Keep it up!

It does indeed take time, resources, energy, etc to produce the items that we use. As long as we are RESPONSIBLE about how we use and dispose of the items, I don't see it as a problem. For instance:

I bought a bottle of Powerade. I don't usually get it, but they're $.88 and I had a $.75 coupon. Before I bought it, I checked the recycling symbol on the bottom (1). My local area can recycle #1 or #2 plastic -- so I'm good on that. BUT BEFORE I RECYCLE IT, I'm going to be reusing it by putting juice in it for my husband to take to work. Why throw it out, when I can reuse it a few times and make sure he drinks something HEALTHY instead of Pepsi? I just covered two steps all in one -- checking the recycling number and reusing what you have.

The next big thing is reusable bags. I spend a ridiculous amount of my time knitting and crocheting, so I make reusable bags to take to the grocery store. Occasionally I've had people compliment me on how pretty they are, and when I tell them what they're for I make sure to encourage them to get their own -- whether they craft them on their own or buy the store reusables, I don't care. I've gotten dirty looks from idiot cashiers before when I hand over the bags, but I don't let that stop me from handing them over.

If I forget the reusable bags, I usually end up consolidating stuff into fewer bags. When the cashier puts the one bottle of dishwashing liquid in its own bag, I take it out and put it in another bag that has a bit of room. That loaf of bread doesn't need its own bag, it can go on the top of the bag with the yogurt. (Those are both examples of last night's excursion.) By watching what the cashier was putting into the bags, I was able to take home two less plastic bags.

We have a bit of a collection of plastic bags from before we started paying attention to just how many we were carrying around all the time. Now, we use them as can liners instead of buying them. They work perfectly fine for the smaller cans that we have around the house (particularly the bathroom), and they come with their own handles you can use to tie them up when they're full! We also keep some in the car in case we forget the cloth bags at home.

Instead of buying individual servings of, say Jello, buy a box of mix and make it yourself! Use an old margarine container or yogurt cup to put the Jello in. Don't get the kid-sized bags of Cheetos, get a big bag of them and put them in a Ziploc bag and reuse the Ziploc bag every day.

I didn't mean to go on so long, but I kept coming up with ideas and when I get started talking it's hard for me to stop (:

I do want to point out a brand of laundry soap that's fairly green and ISN"T HORRIBLY EXPENSIVE -- Ecos liquid detergent. A 100-load jug costs $10.99 ... that's not much more than Tide in my area, and when I did a cost-per-load comparison I figured out it was actually CHEAPER, particularly when it's on sale. You'd be surprised at how some organic/natural products are affordable.

Last bit of advice: Consider the packaging your food comes in. Sure, you love that microwaveable Indian dish, but every ingredient is individually wrapped. Or the organic tea that has PLASTIC WRAPPING around the individual tea bags?! UGH. Look for things with a minimum of packaging, and encourage companies to STOP using unnecessary packaging!

chitownmelli
06-11-2008, 03:01:18 PM
I like that Ecos laundry soap, I used to buy it at Jewel and Dominicks, and it was fantastic!

Mothernature
06-11-2008, 05:52:41 PM
This is my favorite topic.

I understand the dilemma Emily. Your stance is actually antithetical to the purpose of the board. Many people fail to correlate the relationship of their current shopping habits and the impact their choices will have in the future.

I do not agree green requires copious amounts of money. I have found the antithetical result. Living a green lifestyle entails choices, a little research, and understanding. For example, instead of purchasing cleaning products, why not make your own with static plastic bottles? Club soda for window cleaning, baking soda and vinegar to clean many things in your home, grapefruit and salt to clean your bathtub. When shopping at CVS or Walgreens, purchase bar soap instead of liquid soap, eliminate shave cream, do not purchase disposal razors, and buy only what you need. Make one trip per week instead of multiple trips; rideshare! Purchase toys for your children which have reuse value; not plastic junk. Make your own food, grow your own garden, some great trips from above. Shop and support thrift shops. The possibilities are endless:BigHand:

The organic end is not as difficult either. I've saved $200 on organic merchandise using coupons. It is actually cheaper for me to purchase organic v non-organic.

austinmomto2
06-11-2008, 06:12:27 PM
I LOVE this thread! :BigHand: I am a Mod over at OGD and love all the suggestions, tips etc I receive from all the members.

A more environmentally friendly lifestyle is what my family strives for. All of the previous tips and suggestions are wonderful. Since I have 2 young children, I am trying to instill the importance of limiting consumption, thriftiness and recycling into their everyday routine.

Our family does almost everything that has been mentioned. As far as clothes and toys for my children, they have a lot of hand-me-downs as well as consignment store purchases. My house is not a toy box so we minimize the amount of toys my children have. They have a nice collection of toys but many times they are happy to use their creativity and do a lot of pretend play with every-day household items. Also, I clean and if necessary, tape, many of our containers and boxes that our purchases come in ie cereal boxes, ketchup containers, hair bottles. My daughter then uses these in her pretend kitchen and house.

emily26505
06-12-2008, 04:57:22 AM
WOW..thanks so much everyone, I wasn't really expecting much a response on this topic! I am registering at the OGD site, I had no idea it even existed! Mods, are we allowed to link this in our sig? It would just be a little way to spread the word about this site!

emily26505
06-12-2008, 08:01:32 AM
This is my favorite topic.

I understand the dilemma Emily. Your stance is actually antithetical to the purpose of the board. Many people fail to correlate the relationship of their current shopping habits and the impact their choices will have in the future.

I do not agree green requires copious amounts of money. I have found the antithetical result. Living a green lifestyle entails choices, a little research, and understanding. For example, instead of purchasing cleaning products, why not make your own with static plastic bottles? Club soda for window cleaning, baking soda and vinegar to clean many things in your home, grapefruit and salt to clean your bathtub. When shopping at CVS or Walgreens, purchase bar soap instead of liquid soap, eliminate shave cream, do not purchase disposal razors, and buy only what you need. Make one trip per week instead of multiple trips; rideshare! Purchase toys for your children which have reuse value; not plastic junk. Make your own food, grow your own garden, some great trips from above. Shop and support thrift shops. The possibilities are endless:BigHand:

The organic end is not as difficult either. I've saved $200 on organic merchandise using coupons. It is actually cheaper for me to purchase organic v non-organic.

Thank you, thank you for all of your suggestions. These are very easy ways of convserving resources (both financially and environmentally). This is exactly the type of dialogue I was hoping for. I understand that going out and buying environmentally safe cleaning products is more expensive than the "non" brands. But it an be even cheaper by using every day products that you have in your house anyways..or even if you don't keep those things listed, it is still cheaper to buy a box of baking soda for cleaning purposes and can be used much longer than a bottle of liquid cleaner at the store.

I am not making an assumption here that everyone can affod to buy organic/eco-friendly, because I usually cannot. But there are other ways to avoid the financial burden and still be eco-friendly. Excellent ideas, Mothernature..you should start a new thread on how to save money with eco-friendly alternatives :):BigHand::BigHand:

JCausby
06-12-2008, 10:14:05 AM
My family and I have definitely taken more and more steps to become Green. We unplug appliances and phone chargers when they are not in use, recycle, and use resuable bags.

One of the best things my family has done, is almost completely eliminate the use of Paper towels and napkins. I bought 3 6 packs of small dishwashing cloths and we use them for napkins, to clean up spills, and we bought microfiber cloths for cleaning.

Before this step, we would use one roll every week to ten days. Now a roll can last us 3 MONTHS!

MrsPinecone
06-12-2008, 10:16:32 AM
We already have a thread on making your own cleaning products.

http://www.hotcouponworld.com/forums/worked-me/18006-make-your-own-cleaning-products.html

Kristen.C
06-13-2008, 06:15:01 PM
I love the microfiber cleaning cloths too- it really cuts down on paper towel usage for me. I have to second the ECOS laundry detergent, also. I switched to it a couple of months ago when I ran out of All free and clear.

Another thing you can do is to switch to a metal reusable water bottle to help cut down on how much plastic you have to recycle. A few different members over at OGD have them and love them!

There are so many coupons available for natural/organic products but some times you have to ask for them. There is a thread at OGD about contacting companies for coupons as well as a results list for who got what in return!

Hope to see you on the green side. :smile:

Kristen.C
06-14-2008, 07:08:46 AM
I wanted to come back and add that I've also started using our cloth napkins every night for dinner. It's been a budget saver because we use less paper napkins and we can just throw them right in with the towels. You can check the clearance areas at Bed, Bath and Beyond type stores or check out the local goodwill stores to find great prices.

emily26505
07-01-2008, 06:00:48 AM
cloth napkins are such a great idea, I haven't used them in a long time although my mom never bought paper ones growing up, we always used cloth ones! I should really invest and get a few..not to mention they look much more elegant than paper ones if you have guests :)

btw..we have been grilling out a lot since it is nice outside, and I was wondering if anyone knows if there are any clean or "organic"-type grilling necessities? such as charcoal and lighter fluid..or is it all just sending up toxic smoke signals, lol?

mythreeiggys
07-01-2008, 06:31:42 AM
That is an awesome site! I love to recycle because I feel like I am doing my part to help but I never realized just how detailed I should be with conserving energy! The part I loved the best was when I went in and made my pledges to do and there was on about recycling newspaper. I am really big on recycling my news paper because of the amount of them I get a week for the inserts. It says that 1 ton (I think that was the amount) of recycled newspaper is enough to run a 3 bedroom home! Love this site and will def. be keeping up on my pledges and reading more to find out what I can do!! Thanks alot for sharing!!!

derketchup
07-01-2008, 06:46:41 AM
I use lots of cloth products in place of paper:

cloth "paper towels" unless I'm handling dead meat (not likely!)
cloth napkins instead of paper ones
microfiber cloths instead of paper towels for washing windows, etc
heck, I even use cloth, reusable pads unless I am away from home for too long!

I also wash and reuse plastic storage bags until they are useless (and I don't reuse them if they've ever held meat, but again not likely).

My "canisters" are made out of glass jars that previously held products (I love spaghetti sauce jars).


Come hang out with us at Organic Grocery Deals (http://www.organicgrocerydeals.com) -- we try hard to balance deal hunting and coupon usage with being green. I think we do a pretty decent job :biggrin:

bumblebee123
07-01-2008, 04:38:54 PM
One thing that almost everyone can do (that is green and economical) is cut down or give up meat and dairy. It takes many pounds of grain to grow one pound of meat.

I make inexpensive meatless meals almost every day. I also buy a lot of foods, such as beans, lentils, and rice in bulk, so there is less packaging to throw away.

Of course, I try not to drive anymore than necessary and I clean practically everything in my house with vinegar. :smile:

I'mASaver
07-01-2008, 08:21:55 PM
Some things DH and I have done are to get rid of all our regular incandescent light bulbs and go with the "greener" fluorescent ones. It cost us about $70 to do it and we haven't seen any significant energy savings but we live in Florida and the temps are heating up quickly. The only way we can figure to calculate any savings is to compare our actual useage from this year to last year. A project I have yet to undertake. In addition, our power company met with State Legislatures today in an attempt so seek a 16% increase due to rising energy costs. There was no news on the decision as of tonight.

We've also put up a clothesline and stopped using the (natural gas) dryer. This was a huge disappointment. After our first complete billing cycle we only saw a $1.98 reduction in our bill compared to the previous month. The only thing I can think of is I am cooking more at home which is using up more of the gas. In addition to the savings disappointment, it is incredibly time consuming to use the clothesline. In and out, back and forth, taking down, hanging up, so forth and so on. I work full-time and this may not be the best use of my time and resources if it's going to consume my weekends but I'm not giving up yet. I told DH I'll give it two more billing cycles.

We have also planted a multitude of fruit trees. Navel Orange, Tangerine, Lemon, Lime and Avocado. Not to mention our tomatoes, sweet peppers and jalapeno peppers. All of this at a cost of over $300.00. The citrus would have produced this fall but we were advised to prune all fruit buds and wait until next fall to yield a better harvest and much sweeter fruit. We water from our well (not City water) and our salt content may be too high for the Avocado to survive at all and we've had irregular rain fall making the tomatoes not much larger than cherry size and barely edible due to splitting and cracking from the irregular watering/rainfall. In addition to the original planting costs we have incurred at least $150 in natural fertilization (manure) and natural insect repellants.

Our personal attempt at "Going Green" has cost us significantly. Fortunately, at this point, we have the cash to do it but as we are both in the ever declining construction/housing industry and both of our livlihoods are at stake we can only hope our "investments" will pay off at some point in the future although as I see it now it will literally take years. As much as we enjoy our fruit, I can't see us enjoying hundreds of dollars of it in the next couple of years. My dad asked me how long it would take before we broke even on our fluorescent bulbs. I couldn't answer that question.

What I DO know, is everytime I'm outside hanging up laundry and DH is pollenating his tomato plants with his artist paint brush because we have no bees, and he hollers over at me, "Baby, you're looking awfully Green", I feel I'm doing something right.

One thing I forgot to mention was the PUR water filter we installed in January. It worked beautifully for 4 months and we all but eliminated our bottled water consumption (our City water not only tastes terrible but has a terrible chemical smell. I won't even give it to the dog. He's always gotten bottled water!). Shortly after the 4 month time-frame it sprung a huge leak and became useless. I have yet to contact them as it's another thing on my never-ending list of things to do and yet shows another attempt on our part to do the right thing for our planet. Unfortunately, because of this failure we have gone back to bottled water. Hopefully PUR will accept responsibility and make things right so we can get focused in the right direction again with our water consumption.

emily26505
07-02-2008, 11:12:10 AM
Some things DH and I have done are to get rid of all our regular incandescent light bulbs and go with the "greener" fluorescent ones. It cost us about $70 to do it and we haven't seen any significant energy savings but we live in Florida and the temps are heating up quickly. The only way we can figure to calculate any savings is to compare our actual useage from this year to last year. A project I have yet to undertake. In addition, our power company met with State Legislatures today in an attempt so seek a 16% increase due to rising energy costs. There was no news on the decision as of tonight.

We've also put up a clothesline and stopped using the (natural gas) dryer. This was a huge disappointment. After our first complete billing cycle we only saw a $1.98 reduction in our bill compared to the previous month. The only thing I can think of is I am cooking more at home which is using up more of the gas. In addition to the savings disappointment, it is incredibly time consuming to use the clothesline. In and out, back and forth, taking down, hanging up, so forth and so on. I work full-time and this may not be the best use of my time and resources if it's going to consume my weekends but I'm not giving up yet. I told DH I'll give it two more billing cycles.

We have also planted a multitude of fruit trees. Navel Orange, Tangerine, Lemon, Lime and Avocado. Not to mention our tomatoes, sweet peppers and jalapeno peppers. All of this at a cost of over $300.00. The citrus would have produced this fall but we were advised to prune all fruit buds and wait until next fall to yield a better harvest and much sweeter fruit. We water from our well (not City water) and our salt content may be too high for the Avocado to survive at all and we've had irregular rain fall making the tomatoes not much larger than cherry size and barely edible due to splitting and cracking from the irregular watering/rainfall. In addition to the original planting costs we have incurred at least $150 in natural fertilization (manure) and natural insect repellants.

Our personal attempt at "Going Green" has cost us significantly. Fortunately, at this point, we have the cash to do it but as we are both in the ever declining construction/housing industry and both of our livlihoods are at stake we can only hope our "investments" will pay off at some point in the future although as I see it now it will literally take years. As much as we enjoy our fruit, I can't see us enjoying hundreds of dollars of it in the next couple of years. My dad asked me how long it would take before we broke even on our fluorescent bulbs. I couldn't answer that question.

What I DO know, is everytime I'm outside hanging up laundry and DH is pollenating his tomato plants with his artist paint brush because we have no bees, and he hollers over at me, "Baby, you're looking awfully Green", I feel I'm doing something right.

One thing I forgot to mention was the PUR water filter we installed in January. It worked beautifully for 4 months and we all but eliminated our bottled water consumption (our City water not only tastes terrible but has a terrible chemical smell. I won't even give it to the dog. He's always gotten bottled water!). Shortly after the 4 month time-frame it sprung a huge leak and became useless. I have yet to contact them as it's another thing on my never-ending list of things to do and yet shows another attempt on our part to do the right thing for our planet. Unfortunately, because of this failure we have gone back to bottled water. Hopefully PUR will accept responsibility and make things right so we can get focused in the right direction again with our water consumption.


I'm sorry you are not having such great luck in accomplishing your goals, I have a few suggestions/words of advice for ya! I know it is expensive to change all of your bulbs to the energy saver ones, but trust me..once those winter months roll around where its not as bright outside and once you've gotten enough electric bills to compare them to, you will see the difference. They also last MUCH longer than regular bulbs, so you will see savings in not having to purchase new bulbs as often as well.

I am also very surprised that you haven't seen much of a reduction from not using your dryer. I stopped using mine about 2 months ago and already my electric bill has dropped by about 30/mo. You can also try washing your clothes in cold water instead of hot/warm. This saves electricity by not having to heat up the water in your hot water tank. You can buy detergents especially for cold water, so you still get clean clothes.

As far as the fruit trees go, just be patient with those. You may have spent 300 initially, but those will continue bearing fruit for many many years to come. You may also want to consider buying produce at local farmers markets or produce stands in the mean time. This helps support local farmers and is easy on the environment by not having to use the fuel to ship the produce to a grocery store. (not to mention, they usually have a lot less chemicals on them than in the store).

The water filter on your tap is a great idea! I almost want to cry when I go to a meeting for work and I see that the trash can at the end of the day is filled to the brim with plastic drink bottles. I don't understand this at all, tap water is perfectly fine to drink. If PUR doesn't help you out with the broken fixture, you can try a Brita filter pitcher. I keep one in my fridge and just refill it from the tap when it gets empty. I always have fresh, clean water on hand and the filters last a while as well. IMO, it's probably less things to break with a pitcher than it is with a filter on your tap.

You should really check out the website I mentioned in the first post. You calculate your carbon footprint, then it asks you if you would like to make any pledges to be greener. Most of the pledges require no money at all, and you will be shocked at the small things you can do that add up to make such a huge difference. Ok, sorry so long, hope that helped! :wavehi:

saving4earlyretirement
07-08-2008, 07:41:18 AM
Emily -

Thanks for this - I just took the quiz and was shocked at how high my score was - obviously, I'm leaving things on the table - heading over to the website to figure out what else I can do.....

Mothernature
07-15-2008, 06:55:48 PM
preserve everyday (http://www.recycline.com/products.html)

tivaclare
07-16-2008, 11:52:24 AM
Good for you!! I agree it can be expensive "going green" so we try to do little things on our own. I've taken a lot of making my own resuable grocery bags from both fabric and old plastic bags, so that's something. I will be giving them out with gifts this year as well to help promote "greeness".

I can't quite remember the name of it, but there is a gadget you can buy that calculates how much power a given electrical item in your house (from the fridge down to the nightlight). You might want to look into those to find the hidden power hogs in your house and cut down on emissions that way.

We found out that our PS3 uses as much power as our fridge WHEN TURNED "OFF", so we've made a habit of keeping it on a power strip so it gets turned completely at night with no power source. I've read that keeping things on power strips and turning them off at night can make a decent impact.

emily26505
07-17-2008, 06:41:38 AM
Emily -

Thanks for this - I just took the quiz and was shocked at how high my score was - obviously, I'm leaving things on the table - heading over to the website to figure out what else I can do.....

Glad you found that website useful! I found that most of the tips were very easy and required no money to be invested. They also were not the typical "cliche" suggestions that lots of people have (and that a lot of consciencious (sp?) people already do). My favorite was about placing a filled water bottle in tank of your toilet to reduce the amount of water each flush. It says it can save you hundreds of galons of water each year. I did this and barely noticed a difference in water level in the bowl of my toilet and haven't had a problem yet. Even though I don't pay utility fees at my apt, I feel like I'm having more of an environmental impact for my apt complex than a financial one.

I have also started making my own laundry detergent (powdered) in order to reduce the amount of plastic packaging and waste (although it was recycled). I found that it is a savings of about 75% for me to make my own and I store it in clean washed pickle and pasta jars that I save. The recipe is:

2 cup grated landry soap (I have even used regular Ivory bars)
1 cups Borax
1 cup Washing Soda

Then you only need 2 Tbsp per full load. You can use a couple tablespoons of vinegar as fabric softener since that stuff is so expensive andddd..comes in plastic containers, lol. (And the vinegar does not stink up your clothes, haha).

The detergent comes out to about 1-5 cents per load, depending on how much your ingredients cost you (I get the soap at the $ store or CVS when it's free!) :smile:

emily26505
07-17-2008, 06:45:49 AM
Good for you!! I agree it can be expensive "going green" so we try to do little things on our own. I've taken a lot of making my own resuable grocery bags from both fabric and old plastic bags, so that's something. I will be giving them out with gifts this year as well to help promote "greeness".

I can't quite remember the name of it, but there is a gadget you can buy that calculates how much power a given electrical item in your house (from the fridge down to the nightlight). You might want to look into those to find the hidden power hogs in your house and cut down on emissions that way.

We found out that our PS3 uses as much power as our fridge WHEN TURNED "OFF", so we've made a habit of keeping it on a power strip so it gets turned completely at night with no power source. I've read that keeping things on power strips and turning them off at night can make a decent impact.


Yesss if you find out what these gadgets are called, let us know! I saw them on the news but they didn't say what they were called, just described using them and how they can save you money lol. Thanks! :wavehi:

tivaclare
08-01-2008, 09:16:29 PM
I'm so sorry this took so long, I forgot to check the thread!!

Here is the one I've seen people talking about most, although I know there are a few other imitators out there that may be cheaper, etc. Amazon has several different models. This is the cheapest I think. It's called "Kill A Watt"

Amazon.com: P3 International P4400 Kill A Watt Electricity Usage Monitor: Electronics (http://www.amazon.com/P3-International-P4400-Electricity-Monitor/dp/B00009MDBU/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=electronics&qid=1217650502&sr=8-1)

MamaBird06
08-14-2008, 04:43:41 PM
One thing that almost everyone can do (that is green and economical) is cut down or give up meat and dairy. It takes many pounds of grain to grow one pound of meat.

I make inexpensive meatless meals almost every day. I also buy a lot of foods, such as beans, lentils, and rice in bulk, so there is less packaging to throw away.

Of course, I try not to drive anymore than necessary and I clean practically everything in my house with vinegar. :smile:

Dh won't eat beef/pork for cultural/religious reasons, but i stopped eating it for environmental reasons. Of course we are still eating dairy, eggs and occassionally poultry, but they have less impact on the environment. I can say that getting some things cheap/free, has enabled me to sometimes buy organic,which i wouldn't have done before couponing.

I do feel guilty sometimes about purchasing non-organic health and beauty products though. I think that will be the hardest thing to eventually give up, plus i have have stockpile of it to last for a long time. But we are also trying to save up for the trip to india and pay off a couple credit cards, so budgeting is of utmost importance.

My new year's resolution this year was to go greener, so far i have bought the reusuable grocery bags, and starting recycling paper, cardboard, tin, aluminum and plastics. Our town has free recycle sites at the walmarts and farmer's market in town.

i started my first garden this year, that is exciting, and a lot of work. I haven't had much yield from it, but i planted late in the year, but my green peppers are looking good! I have peeled and frozen a gallon of dwarf peaches from our tree too. I plan on freezing everything that can be, for later in the year, canning will be a lesson for next year.

Of which if i buy organic, i try to get organic dairy/eggs, and try to avoid the dirty dozen of produce:they have the most pesticides: lettuce, potatoes, apples, pears, imported grapes, peache, nectarines, spinach, green bell peppers, cherries, celery and strawberries. I do sometimes buy non-organic of these items, but if the organic variety is on sale I will most likely pick it up even if it is a little more than non organic.

I tried out the recycled toilet paper from cvs, not that great, but i am trying to make an effort.

maggiew
08-24-2008, 06:22:56 AM
[quote=Mothernature;915833]This is my favorite topic.

. For example, instead of purchasing cleaning products, why not make your own with static plastic bottles? Club soda for window cleaning, baking soda and vinegar to clean many things in your home, grapefruit and salt to clean your bathtub.

I'm really intrigued-how do I do this? Do I mix it first? Do I pour on salt and then use the grapefruit? I'd love to try this.

Kristen.C
08-24-2008, 07:35:18 AM
Dh won't eat beef/pork for cultural/religious reasons, but i stopped eating it for environmental reasons. Of course we are still eating dairy, eggs and occassionally poultry, but they have less impact on the environment. I can say that getting some things cheap/free, has enabled me to sometimes buy organic,which i wouldn't have done before couponing.

I do feel guilty sometimes about purchasing non-organic health and beauty products though. I think that will be the hardest thing to eventually give up, plus i have have stockpile of it to last for a long time. But we are also trying to save up for the trip to india and pay off a couple credit cards, so budgeting is of utmost importance.

My new year's resolution this year was to go greener, so far i have bought the reusuable grocery bags, and starting recycling paper, cardboard, tin, aluminum and plastics. Our town has free recycle sites at the walmarts and farmer's market in town.

i started my first garden this year, that is exciting, and a lot of work. I haven't had much yield from it, but i planted late in the year, but my green peppers are looking good! I have peeled and frozen a gallon of dwarf peaches from our tree too. I plan on freezing everything that can be, for later in the year, canning will be a lesson for next year.

Of which if i buy organic, i try to get organic dairy/eggs, and try to avoid the dirty dozen of produce:they have the most pesticides: lettuce, potatoes, apples, pears, imported grapes, peache, nectarines, spinach, green bell peppers, cherries, celery and strawberries. I do sometimes buy non-organic of these items, but if the organic variety is on sale I will most likely pick it up even if it is a little more than non organic.

I tried out the recycled toilet paper from cvs, not that great, but i am trying to make an effort.

Good for you!

Which brand of toilet paper from CVS? We've been buying Marcal and so far that's the best of the recycled brands IMO. One of those 1000 rolls seems to last pretty long and it doesn't have a weird texture.

cashqueen
09-04-2008, 11:52:32 AM
I'm interested in trying this, too. Is it grapefruit juice and salt or an actual grapefruit?


[quote=Mothernature;915833]This is my favorite topic.

. For example, instead of purchasing cleaning products, why not make your own with static plastic bottles? Club soda for window cleaning, baking soda and vinegar to clean many things in your home, grapefruit and salt to clean your bathtub.

I'm really intrigued-how do I do this? Do I mix it first? Do I pour on salt and then use the grapefruit? I'd love to try this.

ladyeeyore7
12-22-2008, 02:57:14 PM
I have 2 thoughts I would like to put out there. First, I am trying to go greener also. I started thinking about how my grandparents lived when I was a kid. They were actually pretty green but by default as it was more the standard of living. For example, how often do people throw out cheap broken appliances such as tv's, vcr's, blenders, etc. My grandparents had to save their pennies until they had enough to buy what they wanted or put it on layaway. So they would try to look for the best brands that would last the longest and made sure it was exactly what they wanted. If it broke it went to a repair shop to be fixed which was cheaper than buying a replacement. Grandma saved the potato water after boiling peeled potatos for other recipes. The potato peels went into the garden for composting. Also if a person had a home that was 2000 sf or bigger it was a mansion. If you had a change of clothes and underwear for every day for 2 weeks you were rich. Most things were handmade, few things were purchased. Grandpa made coffee tables and end tables for themselves and my parents using wood from pallets and I guarantee if you saw them you would never know it. No part of them resembled a pallet in any manner. Any fabric scraps from clothes were cut and used in quilts where possible. If they were too small for a quilt they were used as stuffing for pillows or whatever. I could go on like this for pages but I'll stop, I know I get too wordy. This was not extraordinary living, everyone in the neighborhood lived that way. Anyway, just something to think about, I do.

Also, anything in disposable plastic (that means water bottles, butter tubs, ziploc bags, etc.) is manufactured in a lower grade. If you want to recycle it please do but don't reuse it. The lower grade means it is not as stable a product as reusable plastic and you will ingest plastic particles. Not good for your health at all!